A New Citizen Decides to Leave the Tumult of Trump’s America

As American values shifted, and the New York that she loved changed, one naturalized citizen found herself changing too, so she and her family decided to return to her native England even though it was no longer home.

Source: The New Yorker
Published: Aug 20, 2018
Length: 23 minutes (5,920 words)

Nicole Holofcener’s Human Comedies

A profile of filmmaker Nicole Holofcener, whose movies — from her 1996 debut, “Walking and Talking,” to the as yet to be released “Land of Steady Habits” — are informed to varying degrees by her own experiences.

Author: Ariel Levy
Source: The New Yorker
Published: Aug 6, 2018
Length: 23 minutes (5,888 words)

Les Moonves and CBS Face Allegations of Sexual Misconduct

Meticulous reporting from Ronan Farrow on allegations from six women who say they experienced unwanted sexual advances from Les Moonves, the chairman and C.E.O. of CBS Corporation. In addition, 30 current and former CBS employees described experiences of “harassment, gender discrimination, or retaliation at the network.”

Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jul 27, 2018
Length: 36 minutes (9,000 words)

How E-Commerce Is Transforming Rural China

JD.com is China’s second-largest e-commerce company. By using rural villages’ social networks to recruit new customers and employees, the company is capturing the country’s growing online retail market, improving Chinese life and possibly giving villagers an incentive not to leave for the city.

Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jul 18, 2018
Length: 32 minutes (8,008 words)

How George Clinton Made Funk a World View

Hua Hsu considers the heirs and influence of P-Funk founder George Clinton on the eve of Clinton’s retirement from performing.

Author: Hua Hsu
Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jul 9, 2018
Length: 9 minutes (2,406 words)

Can Andy Byford Save the Subways?

The new president of the New York City Transit Authority is smart, seems almost unfailingly polite, and is very English. Whether that’s enough to enable him to wrangle the system he’s been tasked with fixing remains to be seen. William Finnegan paints a deft portrait of Andy Byford settling into his new job and getting his C train legs.

Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jul 2, 2018
Length: 37 minutes (9,389 words)

The Obsessive Search for the Tasmanian Tiger

The fox-like marsupial carnivore known as the Tasmanian Tiger was declared extinct in 1936, but some Australians have dedicated their lives to proving it still lurks in the Tasmanian bush. Don’t compare it to bigfoot. Unlike bigfoot, the tiger was real.

Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jun 25, 2018
Length: 26 minutes (6,626 words)

Paisley Park, Prince’s Lonely Palace

For the New Yorker, Amanda Petrusich tours Paisley Park, the home and recording studio of the late Prince.

Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jun 25, 2018
Length: 13 minutes (3,469 words)

Why Did I Teach My Son to Speak Russian?

When bilingualism isn’t obviously valuable, you have to decide what you think of the language.

Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jun 14, 2018
Length: 17 minutes (4,475 words)

The Bullshit-Job Boom

Existentialists with agita, rejoice. We now have an anthropologist’s new book confirming that what we do means nothing. David Greaber’s Bullshit Jobs examines the current work economy and how we attribute meaning to our lives with possibly (probably?) meaningless tasks.

Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jun 7, 2018
Length: 10 minutes (2,555 words)