The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week, we’re sharing stories from Roxane Gay, Katherine Heiny, Alexandra Starr, Dionne Searcey, and Anna Silman.

This week, we’re sharing stories from Roxane Gay, Katherine Heiny, Alexandra Starr, Dionne Searcey, and Anna Silman.

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1. ‘Tiny House Hunters’ and the Shrinking American Dream

Roxane Gay | Curbed | October 25, 2017 | 6 minutes (1,705 words)

The dream of homeownership, now with composting toilets.

2. ‘Reality Shrivels. This Is Your Life Now’: 88 Days Trapped in Bed to Save a Pregnancy

Katherine Heiny | The Guardian | October 24, 2017 | 20 minutes (5,000 words)

When Katherine Heiny’s water broke during her 26th week of pregnancy, her doctor told her that in order to save her baby she would have to be almost totally immobilized “in Trendelenburg,” an aggressive form of bed rest in which her legs were raised above her head. She remained on bed rest for 88 days and found comfort reading the memoir of Steve Callahan, a sailor who survived adrift at sea for 74 days.

3. Pushing the Limit

Alexandra Starr | Harper’s Magazine | October 20, 2017 | 26 minutes (6,591 words)

How the U.S. Olympic Committee inadequately addresses sexual abuse in youth athletics, and what that tells us about how institutions enable predators.

4. Boko Haram Strapped Suicide Bombs to Them. Somehow These Teenage Girls Survived.

Dionne Searcey | The New York Times | October 25, 2017 | 12 minutes (3,105 words)

The New York Times interviewed 18 teen girls — all of whom were kidnapped by Boko Haram in Nigeria to become suicide bombers for their cause. Unwilling to hurt and kill innocents, these girls — some as young as 13 years old — bravely defied the militants and sought help from citizens and soldiers alike to remove the bombs strapped to their bodies before anyone could be harmed.

5. What Would Sarah Polley Do?

Anna Silman | New York Magazine | October 26, 2017 | 16 minutes (4,020 words)

Anna Silman profiles actor and director Sarah Polley, on the occasion of the première of her Netflix miniseries, “Alias Grace,” an adaptation of a 1996 novel by Margaret Atwood.