The origins and the politics of the New York-based Freelancers Union—now 150,000 members strong:

The shift toward short-term contracts was underway long before the 2008 financial crash. Charles Heckscher, director of the Center for Workplace Transformation at Rutgers University, sits on the board of the Freelancers Union, and likes to describe this shift in terms of “flexibility.” As the economy shifted away from manufacturing jobs and toward knowledge- and tech-based ones, he argues, “companies have clearly and widely moved away from taking responsibility for long-term careers. These certainly include crude cost-cutting considerations, but they also reflect the deeper economic changes…with skills and demand metamorphosing so rapidly in so many domains, it is often more effective to look for those with needed skills on the open market rather than developing them internally. Once companies begin to do that, they tend to break the whole pattern of expectations and commitments which grounded the classic system.”

“The ‘I’ in Union.” — Atossa Araxia Abrahamian, Dissent

See also: “In the Wake of Protest: One Woman’s Attempt to Unionize Amazon.” The Atlantic, Dec. 12, 2011