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The Suicide Epidemic

What is it about modern society that is causing suicide rates to rise? An in-depth look at the latest research, and a theory by Dr. Thomas Joiner:

"It’s a 'clearly delineated danger zone,' a set of three overlapping conditions that combine to create a dark alley of the soul. The conditions are tightly defined, and they overlap rarely enough to explain the relatively rare act of suicide. But what’s alarming is that each condition itself isn’t extreme or unusual, and the combined suicidal state of mind is not unfathomably psychotic. On the contrary, suicide’s Venn diagram is composed of circles we all routinely step in, or near, never realizing we are in the deadly center until it’s too late. Joiner’s conditions of suicide are the conditions of everyday life."
SOURCE:Newsweek
PUBLISHED: May 24, 2013
LENGTH: 26 minutes (6696 words)

The Devil in Deryl Dedmon

A killing in Mississippi is the first in the state to lead to a hate-crime conviction. Deryl Dedmon is going to prison for killing a 47-year-old black man, James Anderson, with his truck:

"The Dedmon case is shocking for many reasons, but none more disturbing than this belief that a churchgoing white teenager could kill a blameless African-American man he called a 'nigger' and not be a racist. By all legal definitions, what he did was a hate crime. And yet it also appears to have been a chillingly unacknowledged one—an extreme example of white people doing racist things while rejecting the R word itself. David Duke. George Wallace. James Watson. Michael Richards. Don Imus. The list is long and always growing, the rolls swelling in banal and not-so-banal ways. At root, all this 'nonracism' reflects a national confusion—now that police dogs and burning crosses are behind us—about just what a 21st-century racist is."
SOURCE:Newsweek
PUBLISHED: April 9, 2012
LENGTH: 14 minutes (3579 words)

My Father The Dope Dealer

When I was young, we lived the high life. Then it all went up in smoke.
SOURCE:Newsweek
PUBLISHED: Aug. 1, 2009
LENGTH: 17 minutes (4324 words)