Grieving with Brahms

“There is enormous sadness in his work, a sadness that glows with understanding.”

Author: Alex Ross
Source: The New Yorker
Published: Apr 16, 2020
Length: 6 minutes (1,555 words)

The Past and the Future of the Earth’s Oldest Trees

Sequoias can live for thousands of years, but a single bristlecone in California’s White Mountains can live indefinitely. This gnarled tree species will outlive humanity.

Author: Alex Ross
Source: The New Yorker
Published: Jan 13, 2020
Length: 24 minutes (6,244 words)

Love on the March

A brief history of the LGBT movement:

“I am forty-four years old, and I have lived through a startling transformation in the status of gay men and women in the United States. Around the time I was born, homosexual acts were illegal in every state but Illinois. Lesbians and gays were barred from serving in the federal government. There were no openly gay politicians. A few closeted homosexuals occupied positions of power, but they tended to make things more miserable for their kind. Even in the liberal press, homosexuality drew scorn: in The New York Review of Books, Philip Roth denounced the “ghastly pansy rhetoric” of Edward Albee, and a Time cover story dismissed the gay world as a ‘pathetic little second-rate substitute for reality, a pitiable flight from life.’ David Reuben’s 1969 best-seller, ‘Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask)’—a book I remember perusing shakily at the library—advised that ‘if a homosexual who wants to renounce homosexuality finds a psychiatrist who knows how to cure homosexuality, he has every chance of becoming a happy, well-adjusted heterosexual.'”

Author: Alex Ross
Source: The New Yorker
Published: Nov 5, 2012
Length: 30 minutes (7,526 words)