Search Results for: Playboy Interview

The Genius of the Playboy Interview

Germaine Greer gave an interview to Playboy in 1973 in which she skewered the magazine: "I'm against showing girls as if they were pork chops." (The Sydney Morning Herald/Fairfax Media via Getty Images)

Hugh Hefner was a complicated individual whose notions of sexuality and human relationships were at once woke and predatory, who stumbled upon a brilliant idea at a time when American culture was milquetoast. A loss of identity in the 1950s, particularly among men, was palpable for a generation who no longer had a war to fight. It took a magazine that paired the mind and the body, high culture and naked women, to shake the male from his slumber. Read more…

Playboy Interview: Gawker’s Nick Denton

Longreads Pick

The media entrepreneur’s vision for the future of content and journalism:

DENTON: The Panopticon—the prison in which everybody is exposed to scrutiny all the time. Do you remember the website Fucked Company? It was big in about 2000, 2001. I was CEO of Moreover Technologies at the time. A saleswoman put in an anonymous report to the site about my having paid for the eye operation of a young male executive I had the hots for. The story, like many stories, was roughly half true. Yes, there was a young male executive. Yes, he did have an eye operation. No, it wasn’t paid for by me. It was paid for by the company’s health insurance according to normal procedure. And no, I didn’t fancy him; I detested him. It’s such a great example of Fucked Company and, by extension, most internet discussion systems. There’s some real truth that gets told that is never of a scale to warrant mainstream media attention, and there’s also no mechanism for fact-checking, no mechanism to actually converge on some real truth. It’s out there. Half of it’s right. Half of it’s wrong. You don’t know which half is which. What if we could develop a system for collaboratively reaching the truth? Sources and subjects and writers and editors and readers and casual armchair experts asking questions and answering them, with follow-ups and rebuttals. What if we could actually have a journalistic process that didn’t require paid journalists and tape recorders and the cost of a traditional journalistic operation? You could actually uncover everything—every abusive executive, every corrupt eye operation.

Source: Playboy
Published: Feb 21, 2014
Length: 30 minutes (7,539 words)

Playboy Interview: Stephen Colbert

Longreads Pick

[Not single-page] The Comedy Central star on his TV character’s clash with reality, the pain of losing his father and brothers at a young age, and his fear of bears:

PLAYBOY: How did bears become a recurring motif on the show? Was it just to have something to talk about that wasn’t topical?

COLBERT: For the very first show, we were trying to find something that had a repeatable structure. We had this bit called ‘ThreatDown,’ when he talks about the number one threat to America that week. We were considering another story, something from Florida about a Burmese python that had grown to 13 feet long and swallowed an alligator and the alligator had eaten its way out of the snake. It was a really crazy story with horrible pictures. Then a bear story came up that wasn’t as flashy, but we went with it. Partly because bears are very resonant to me, because I really do have a bit of a bear problem. And it just seemed like a richer fear to us. We always said that anything my character is concerned about qualifies as news. If he says bears are the number one threat to America, then that is the case.

PLAYBOY: He’s justifying his own anxieties?

COLBERT: Exactly. ‘I want to make you afraid of the things I’m afraid of.'”

Source: Playboy
Published: Oct 16, 2012
Length: 29 minutes (7,463 words)

Playboy Interview: Bill Gates (1994)

Playboy Interview: Bill Gates (1994)

Playboy Interview: Bill Gates (1994)

Longreads Pick

PLAYBOY: Does your net worth of multi-billions, despite the fact that it’s mostly in stock and the value varies daily, boggle your mind? GATES: It’s a ridiculous number. But remember, 95 percent of it I’m just going to give away. [Smiles] Don’t tell people to write me letters. I’m saving that for when I’m in my 50s. It’s a lot to give away and it’s going to take time. PLAYBOY: Where will you donate it? GATES: To charitable things, scientific things. I don’t believe in burdening any children I might have with that. They’ll have enough. They’ll be comfortable.

Source: Playboy
Published: Jul 1, 1994
Length: 55 minutes (13,960 words)

Longreads Topic Du Jour: The Playboy Interview

Longreads Topic Du Jour: The Playboy Interview

Playboy Interview: Martin Luther King Jr.

Longreads Pick

I have a job to do. If I were constantly worried about death, I couldn’t function. After a while, if your life is more or less constantly in peril, you come to a point where you accept the possibility philosophically. I must face the fact, as all others in positions of leadership must do, that America today is an extremely sick nation, and that something could well happen to me at any time. I feel, though, that my cause is so right, so moral, that if I should lose my life, in some way it would aid the cause. #MLK

Author: Alex Haley
Source: Playboy
Published: Jan 1, 1965
Length: 65 minutes (16,271 words)

Playboy Interview: John Lennon and Yoko Ono (1980)

Longreads Pick

PLAYBOY: What is the Eighties’ dream to you, John? LENNON: Well, you make your own dream. That’s the Beatles’ story, isn’t it? That’s Yoko’s story. That’s what I’m saying now. Produce your own dream. If you want to save Peru, go save Peru. It’s quite possible to do anything, but not to put it on the leaders and the parking meters. Don’t expect Jimmy Carter or Ronald Reagan or John Lennon or Yoko Ono or Bob Dylan or Jesus Christ to come and do it for you. You have to do it yourself.

Source: Playboy
Published: Jan 1, 1981
Length: 96 minutes (24,169 words)

Playboy Interview: Sarah Silverman

Longreads Pick

It’s a process. When you have an act that’s polished and you’re in the zone, you can’t wait to get out there. But I’m in a place where I’m backstage going, “I have fucking nothing!” I just feel like a loser. But I’ve also realized I can’t go out and keep doing the same fake racist metajokes anymore. Otherwise 30 years will go by and I’ll be the guy onstage going [imitates Andrew Dice Clay], “Hickory dickory dock!”

Source: Playboy
Published: Mar 26, 2010
Length: 24 minutes (6,158 words)

Playboy Interview: Steve Jobs (1985)

Longreads Pick

“We’ve done studies that prove that the mouse is faster than traditional ways of moving through data or applications. Someday we may be able to build a color screen for a reasonable price. As to overpricing, the start-up of a new product makes it more expensive than it will be later. The more we can produce, the lower the price will get.”

Source: Playboy
Published: Feb 1, 1985
Length: 69 minutes (17,287 words)