The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week, we’re sharing stories from Brian Trapp, Alison Kinney, Kate Wagner, Willy Staley, and Suzannah Showler.

This week, we’re sharing stories from Brian Trapp, Alison Kinney, Kate Wagner, Willy Staley, and Suzannah Showler.

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1. Twelve Words

Brian Trapp | Kenyon Review | September 1, 2019 | 28 minutes (7,183 words)

For a vivacious, disabled man with a limited vocabulary, his twin brother’s name came to communicate a range of ideas and emotion. But when it came time to decide his fate, who could really speak for Danny?

2. The Rejection Lab

Alison Kinney | Gay Magazine | September 4, 2019 | 14 minutes (3,663 words)

Alison Kinney visits a Stony Brook University laboratory where the physical and emotional effects of social rejection are studied, and becomes a subject herself.

3. Strike With the Band

Kate Wagner | The Baffler | September 3, 2019 | 15 minutes (3,772 words)

“Classical musicianship is better understood as a job, a shitty job.”

4. King of Pop

Willy Staley | The New York Times Magazine | August 29, 2019 | 21 minutes (5,293 words)

Tyshawn Jones made a name for himself in the skateboarding world by performing spectacular tricks on the chaotic streets of New York. At 20, he’s already opened a restaurant, founded his own hardware company, and was named Thrasher’s “Skater of the Year.”

5. Céline Dion is Everywhere

Suzannah Showler | The Walrus | August 29, 2019 | 23 minutes (5,957 words)

“As she leaves Vegas and heads back into the world, nearly four decades into her career, a full-blown Célinaissance has been declared. But why is her celebrity suddenly so pressing, so meaningful, so of this moment? Céline isn’t exactly new—just about everyone already knows the basic story: born and raised outside Montreal, a preteen singing sensation by fourteen….She’s been around for so long that much of the world has no conscious memory from the Before Céline era: she has always been the soundtrack to grocery store aisles, cab rides, the corniest parts of every cornball movie you hate to love.”