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Author-Editor Interview: George Saunders and Andy Ward

How an editor and writer work together:

"Ward: A lot of people say to me, 'God, it must be so fun to work with George Saunders. Do you even have to edit him at all?' And they say it like they assume you shun all editing, or don’t allow editing, which is always really funny to me, because you are a person who craves feedback, who wants to be pushed and challenged and sent off in new directions. This all sounds self-serving, I realize, so I should add: Of course, at this stage, you don’t need an editor. But you want an editor. Why?

"Saunders: No, I definitely need and enjoy having an editor, and for the exact reasons you state. There’s a really nice moment in the life of a piece of writing where the writer starts to get a feeling of it outgrowing him—or he starts to see it having a life of its own that doesn’t have anything to do with his ego or his desire to 'be a good writer.' It’s almost like an animal starts to appear in the stone and then it starts to move, and you, the writer, are rooting for it so hard—but may not be able to see everything clearly after working on that stone for so long."
SOURCE:Slate
PUBLISHED: Jan. 9, 2013
LENGTH: 11 minutes (2939 words)